Meet the Women: Who is Karen Shosid Weinreb?

Biennially, the Dallas Jewish Historical Society honors members of the Dallas community who embody philanthropy and humanitarianism with the Ann Loeb Sikora Humanitarian Award. This year’s honorees are four outstanding women who have dedicated their lives to others within the Jewish and general Dallas communities. Continue reading to learn about one of this year’s recipients. Karen Shosid Weinreb has been a proud member of the Dallas Jewish Community since childhood. She is a graduate of W.T. White High School (1981) and the University Texas at Austin (1985), where she was a member of the Sigma Delta Tau Sorority. Karen went on to work at The Greensheet in their marketing department. She later left to pursue her greatest passion, motherhood. Karen is the proud mom of Zach, Carly, & Kyle as well as newer additions, AJ and Jackie. As the kids grew up, she was highly involved in their school communities at Levine Academy (Solomon Schechter), Rosemary Haggar Elementary, Frankford Middle School, & Greenhill School. Karen remains an active member of Temple Emanuel and a supporter of The Aaron Family JCC. She recently co-chaired the YES event for The Legacy and has been an unwavering advocate for The Vogel Alcove, Jewish Federation, The Family Place & Jewish Family Services.  Karen has also been a frequent contributor of the Dallas Holocaust Society, AIPAC, The MS Society, Jonathan’s Place, Planned Parenthood, JWRP, and Texas Exes & USC. Stay tuned for additional highlights of the honorees! Click here register for DJHS Sip & Savor 2019. Click here to learn about Ann Loeb Sikora and why we honor her legacy.

Meet the Women: Who is Susan Shosid Bendalin?

Biennially, the Dallas Jewish Historical Society honors members of the Dallas community who embody philanthropy and humanitarianism with the Ann Loeb Sikora Humanitarian Award. This year’s honorees are four outstanding women who have dedicated their lives to others within the Jewish and general Dallas communities. Continue reading to learn about one of this year’s recipients.

Susan Shosid Bendalin has seen the value of philanthropy and commitment to the Jewish community from both sides of the table.  A former Campaign Associate for the Jewish Federation of Greater Dallas, Susan went on to become the Development Director for Akiba Academy and later staffed the Federation’s !00th Anniversary Archive Committee. 

Putting on her volunteer hat, Susan participated in the Leadership Development Group of the Jewish Federation and was a co-chair of the Women-to-Women Fundraising Luncheon for Jewish Family Services. 

An active member of the Jewish Community Center and a tennis program participant, Susan has given a great deal of time and effort to supporting the J, serving as a past member of the Board of Directors.  In addition, Susan was twice a co-chair of the JCC’s annual “Be” event fundraiser as well as chairing the Jewish Arts Fest and serving on the Maccabi Games steering committee. 

Susan and her husband Ken belong to Temple Emanu-El and are the proud parents of three children, Molly, Katie and Jack. Susan has been a long-time volunteer with the Greenhill School Parent Association.  Professionally, Susan is a Stylist and Senior Managing Partner at J. Hilburn.


Stay tuned for additional highlights of the honorees!
Click here register for DJHS Sip & Savor 2019.
Click here to learn about Ann Loeb Sikora and why we honor her legacy.

Meet the Women: Who is Brenda Weinfeld Bliss?

Biennially, the Dallas Jewish Historical Society honors members of the Dallas community who embody philanthropy and humanitarianism with the Ann Loeb Sikora Humanitarian Award. This year’s honorees are four outstanding women who have dedicated their lives to others within the Jewish and general Dallas communities. Continue reading to learn about one of this year’s recipients.

Brenda Weinfeld Bliss has had a passion and desire to work with children and those with special needs throughout her life.  Her early years as a JCC Camp Counselor and those at Muscular Dystrophy Camp led Brenda to pursue an undergraduate degree in Communication Disorders at The University of Texas at Austin and later to receive a Masters Degrees in both Speech/Language Pathology and Audiology through UTD, The Callier Center for Communication Disorders. 

Brenda’s experience in Los Angeles gaining specialized training in cochlear implant rehabilitation led to her own private practice, specializing in working with children with speech, language, and hearing disorders, where she currently leads a staff of ten speech/language pathologists.  Due to her expertise, Brenda has presented workshops all over the world including in Vietnam, Thailand and Innsbruck, speaking on cochlear implant rehabilitation and auditory-verbal therapy. 

Locally, Brenda provides speech and hearing screenings and speech/language therapy services to many of the Jewish Day Schools including Torah Day School, Levine Academy, and Akiba Academy, as well as providing therapy services for adults at CHAI. 

She currently serves on the Board of Directors of Jewish Family Service as well as the Special Needs Partnership.  A longtime member of Temple Shalom, Brenda has been married to Ron for 24 years and they are the proud parents of three boys, Alan, Brennen, and Ryan.  Brenda credits her parents, Jean and Bob Weinfeld, and their strong sense of commitment to the Jewish community and to Tikkun Olam for her passion for philanthropy and desire to help others.

Stay tuned for additional highlights of the honorees!
Click here register for DJHS Sip & Savor 2019.
Click here to learn about Ann Loeb Sikora and why we honor her legacy.

Meet the Women: Who is Melissa Weinfeld Ackerman?

Biennially, the Dallas Jewish Historical Society honors members of the Dallas community who embody philanthropy and humanitarianism with the Ann Loeb Sikora Humanitarian Award. This year’s honorees are four outstanding women who have dedicated their lives to others within the Jewish and general Dallas communities. Continue reading to learn about one of this year’s recipients.

Melissa Weinfeld Ackerman grew up in Dallas and is a graduate of UT-Austin (1979) with a degree in Marketing.  She worked as a buyer for the Horchow Collection and traveled the world looking for special items for the catalogs.  Melissa has been volunteering in the Dallas Jewish community for nearly 40 years, and credits Ann Loeb Sikora as being one of her earliest mentors. 

Her parents, Jean and Bob Weinfeld, have always given their time generously as volunteers and set a wonderful example of giving back to the community.  Melissa has served on the Jewish Federation Board of Directors and has been active in several Divisions. Winner of both the Campaigner of the Year Award and the Bess Nathan Young Leadership Award from the Federation, she also served as a member of the UJA National Young Women’s Leadership Cabinet. 

A past member of the Board of Directors of the Jewish Community Center, Melissa has also chaired many committees and fundraisers, serving as a Vice Chair of the Maccabi Games in 2005 and as a Coordinator and Recruiter of Volunteers for the 2015 Games.  Melissa was on the Board of Directors of Temple Shalom and Jewish Family Service and is currently a member of the Special Needs Partnership Leadership Committee.  She has volunteered for many years in the JFS Food Pantry, for which she received the Volunteer Spotlight Award.  Melissa was actively involved in the JFS Hurricane Harvey relief effort and received the Harvey’s Hero Volunteer Award and the President’s Award for volunteer hours served.  For over a decade, Melissa has given her time and energy to CHAI (Community Homes for Adults, Inc.), currently serving as Vice President of their Board. 

Recently, Melissa, and her husband Baer, were honored by Jewish Family Service with the 2018 Special Needs Partnership Honors Award for helping our community grow to be more inclusive and open to people of all abilities.  They are the proud parents of Emily (fiancé Eduardo Gildenson) and Benjamin.

Stay tuned for additional highlights of the honorees!
Click here to register for DJHS Sip & Savor 2019.
Click here to learn about Ann Loeb Sikora and why we honor her legacy.

From the Archive: Evelyn Sanger Badt’s Majolica Plate Set, c. 1924

Evelyn Sanger Badt was born in 1912 and died in 1995, at 82.

She was the daughter of Ike and Mabel Sanger and married Sig Badt. Her father was I. L. Sanger, Son of Lehman Sanger of the famed Sanger Bros. And, she wasn’t the only Evelyn of the Sanger empire. A different Evelyn Sanger, wife of Elihu Sanger, is referenced in They Came to Stay, “The Jews who Built Dallas,” and “Merchant Princes.”  However, Evelyn and Sig Badt were both prominent within Jewish Dallas, and Dallas at large. As Rose Biderman remarks, the Sangers are the closest thing Dallas ever had to royalty. Their homes, and those of their extended family, as well as their furnishings, and other belongings were luxurious and statement-making.

Evelyn and Sig’s set of Majolica plates are no exception. “Majolica” refers to a style of ceramic wear that originated in Spain and Portugal in the 13th century. Its meaning has since evolved to include a broader range of decorative and functional pottery created in Italy during the Renaissance, in the Victorian era across Europe and the United Kingdom in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The style generally includes a metal-based enamel glaze (traditionally lead and tin) with elaborate hand-painted designs or a layer of bright, iridescent glaze.

This particular style of “Majolica” follows the tradition of functional pottery with incised, or raised, designs and a layer of bright green, iridescent glaze. This producer is Wedgwood, which originated in the UK in the mid 1700s and began producing Majolica-style pottery around 1860. Wedgwood continued production of Majolica until 1940. With this knowledge, and additional information provided by the maker’s marks stamped on the bottom of the plates, we are able to date this particular set of Wedgwood Majolica to 1924 or 1925. Here’s how we were able to determine the date (see below for images of the plate’s reverse and the maker’s marks):

In the mid 1700s, the manufacturer stamped all pottery with individual type-set letters spelling out “Wedgwood,” which later evolved to a single stamp with the same text in a serif font. This style was used until 1929 when the stamp was updated, sans serif. “England” was added to the maker’s mark in 1891 and maintained until 1908 when “Made in England” was adopted and used in all production. So, immediately, we can identify the set of plates as: originating post-1908 and pre-1940.

Back tracking slightly, in 1860, Wedgwood also began adding a three-letter alphabetic code to identify the date of manufacture. In the original Wedgwood code, the first of the three letters identifies the month, while the last of the three letters identifies the year of manufacture. The middle letter was intended as a potter’s mark. The code changed in 1907, when the number 3 replaces the first letter of the code. In 1924, that number changes to a 4. There are charts available that identify the sequence of letters and their corresponding dates. The maker’s mark on this set of plates is 4PB. The “4” indicates that set dates to 1924 or later. The “B,” in one chart suggests 1924, and the other, 1925. Ultimately, by researching the history of Majolica and the manufacturer, we are able to date these plates within one calendar year. Not too shabby for a style of pottery that has evolved over centuries, or for a producer that has lasted over 250 years.

There are twelve plates in the set, which were gifted to Dallas Jewish Historical Society by descendants of Evelyn and Sig Badt as part of the Sanger-Badt Family Collection, donated by Jo Groshardt. Each plate bears similar maker’s marks.

Jessica Schneider, M.A.
DJHS Archivist and Volunteer Director